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Lofland Introduction by John Troyer The fortieth-anniversary edition of a classic and prescient work on death and dying. Request Permissions Exam copy. Overview Author s Praise. Summary The fortieth-anniversary edition of a classic and prescient work on death and dying. Share Share Share email. Authors Lyn H. Mar 23, Valerie rated it it was amazing. This is a topic that I find fascinating and Mr. While reading the first few chapters, I was a little disappointed.

I quickly decided that Mr. Warraich had written a text that should be read by everyone — not just people fascinated with the legal and ethical issues surrounding end of life. Landmark cases are explained and a detailed history of the development of CPR is included. After building a firm foundation, Mr.

Warraich delves into the issues he sees most often as a physician.

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That first earmark on page 91? Patients are afraid that if CPR makes their heart start beating again their brain will have to pay a huge cost. Most people would rather not continuing living if they have to live in a vegetative or severally impaired condition. After an excellent ethical analysis of death and resuscitation efforts, Mr. Warraich considers deeply the role of religion in the dying process.

Modern Death also examines the role of physicians assisting care-givers and surrogate decision makers. He proffers that physicians are usually at the center of the decision-making process and they are often required to buffer the various opinions of family members and caregivers. In addition, he states that the burden placed on surrogate decision makers aka health care proxies is seriously overlooked.

The topics of euthanasia and physician assisted suicide are also touched on in Modern Death. Warraich offers his own personal perspective and thoughts regarding this controversial topic. He provides a unique perspective regarding the shift in opinion over centuries, not just decades. I have added this book to my list of texts that every healthcare professional should consider reading. Additionally, I will be giving it to my parents.

Per Mr. May 12, Lynn Pribus rated it liked it. Two end-of-life emerged on my lengthy library reserve list at the same time. Not pleasant reading, but important. And it isn't pretty. I thought it was especially telling that healthcare workers -- nurses, doctors, and others -- don't die the way members of the gener Two end-of-life emerged on my lengthy library reserve list at the same time. I thought it was especially telling that healthcare workers -- nurses, doctors, and others -- don't die the way members of the general public often do.

That's because healthcare workers avoid ventilators and extreme measures.

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The author of E. More than a DNR is required to escape the extreme measures taken to preserve -- well, not to preserve life, but to preserve breathing and a beating heart even if useful brain function is gone forever. Clearly the author did a ton of research but I found Zitter's book to be much more practical and useful.

Except I hope I never need to read it again and that I and everyone I care about and for just fall asleep one night and never wake again. That's how it was with my mother. She fell and ended up in an ICU with big mitts on her hands to prevent her from pulling out tubes, etc. I invoked hospice and got her out of there in a hurry and back to her own bed where she died five days later with my husband and me with her. It was sad, but it was peaceful. Mar 23, Karen Hoxie rated it it was amazing. Amazing to read from the perspective of a nurse who increasingly feels like she commits medical battery on the elderly every day in the course of her work because their families refuse to let them go.

Stop asking "what else can be done for her medically? It is awful to watch and even worse to be forced to participate in these torturous procedures, tests, and invasions thrust upon the dying.


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Get those advance directives done no Amazing to read from the perspective of a nurse who increasingly feels like she commits medical battery on the elderly every day in the course of her work because their families refuse to let them go. Get those advance directives done now Apr 07, Kate rated it really liked it Shelves: hospice-dying. This is a compelling, interesting read about, as the title says, modern death. I appreciate some of the historical and social background he brings in along with personal stories. He writes about legal battles related to withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment, right-to-die issues and perspectives from the ICU, none of which I ever see in an NC hospice.

That said, I wish he would have explored a Dr.

Methods of Execution

That said, I wish he would have explored a bit more about what a non-acute or critical death looks like to show people how it can be. He touches on it, but you can tell he really doesn't have experience in that arena. I would also argue with the idea, which Warraich repeats throughout, that death is a universally feared and fought concept.

I'm not at all sure that is true, and sounds like a manifestation of our cultural death phobia rather than core part of human nature.

May 08, Haselrig rated it it was amazing Shelves: giveaways. I won this as a Goodreads Giveaway. Wow, I was blown away by this book. It was not what I'd expected, in the best way possible. Warraich writes with such humanity and compassion that it makes tackling a dark and frightening subject almost a pleasure. The reader is guided through all the aspects of death in the modern age, from the difficulty in defining death in the face of medical advances over the past one-hundred years, to the legal and ethical challenges posed by modern death, I won this as a Goodreads Giveaway.

The reader is guided through all the aspects of death in the modern age, from the difficulty in defining death in the face of medical advances over the past one-hundred years, to the legal and ethical challenges posed by modern death, to the spiritual and religious considerations one must take into account when dealing with death. This book is a must read for anyone who wishes to prepare themselves for the inevitability that awaits us all.

Five stars. Apr 11, Jess B rated it really liked it Shelves: death-and-dying. There were a few times when I found this book a little annoying such as when he says that he has never talked to his mother about what sort of life-sustaining interventions she would want, but he knows that she would always want more time; despite the fact that he says in another part of the book that surrogates tend to be more aggressive about treatment than patients would be, and the conclusion of the book saying that we all need to talk about end-of-life issues more in our everyday lives i.

But overall, I liked the book, and I appreciated that he recognized that over-aggressive care can count as "doing harm" and thus going against the "first, do no harm" that guides most doctors , which seems to be a pretty rare insight for doctors. Mar 13, Patricia rated it really liked it. A valuable history of how medical advances have impacted the way people view death as well as how they die.

I found the first chapter on death at the cellular level somewhat challenging to read, but it is worth continuing as there are excellent chapters on many other aspects of the dying experience including the use or not of CPR, the burden carried by health care proxies and the debates around the concept of death with dignity.

The book shines when Dr. Warraich shares personal stories and exp A valuable history of how medical advances have impacted the way people view death as well as how they die. Warraich shares personal stories and experiences, but as a whole it is very readable and illuminating on a subject that many people find hard to discuss. View 1 comment.

"Irreversibility" and the Modern Understanding of Death

Mar 02, Tom Gorski rated it it was amazing. When I learned of this book I was curious Who should read it? Well, anyone who will eventually face death, the families of anyone facing serious illness, caregivers, everyone in the medical profession - that I suspect means everyone should read it. Mar 22, Diana rated it really liked it Shelves: library. Excellent book though admittedly a tricky subject matter.

Well researched, well documented and eye-opening. Aug 19, Ruth-Ellen rated it really liked it.


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Well written and inciteful about the state of death in modern times. He explains cell death, the history of death, ethics, landmark cases, and more. A must read for everyone - especially every Doctor and Nurse. Sep 28, Joanne rated it really liked it. Do not resuscitate me, please. Feb 25, Ashur rated it really liked it Shelves: science , history. Dec 18, Jessica Adams rated it really liked it. I thought this was a very well written and interesting book. The anecdotal stories were effective , and the history of death and its progression in medicine was well illustrated.

'Modern Family' finally reveals details on 'significant' character's death - ABC News

I also really liked how other countries and Cultures were discussed. I would have liked a little more development into quality of life and factors helping to decide measures to prolong, but overall great book.

Along with Atul Gawande's Being Mortal this book has opened my eyes to the immediate, likely future looming before my grandmother and for me as her caregiver. There are days I feel like I'm losing my baseline sanity as surely as she's losing hers health.

Modern Death and Taxes decklists

But this book gave me perspective and hope and a dose of the reality I suspected but was ultimately too ignorant to nail down. It also showed me Along with Atul Gawande's Being Mortal this book has opened my eyes to the immediate, likely future looming before my grandmother and for me as her caregiver.

It also showed me that we have choices not typically, or ever, presented and we may have to fight to enact those choices.

I'm ready for the fight.